5 star review for “Spellbound by Sibella” by Paul B McNulty

I was pleased to receive a 5 star review for my historical novel, Spellbound by Sibella, from Jack Hudson on Amazon.com. It runs as follows:

Fascinating, scandalous….

The story of Sibella and Sir Harry is a fascinating one. The political implications, the intrigues, the pressure on the weak Sir Harry to marry an heiress and desert his true wife and children – great stuff. The gruesome witchcraft adds to the drama, and gives an insight into the lives of the common people. Indeed, a lot of the story’s interest lies in the sense it gives of fidelity to the society it depicts: it’s based on true events, even if one hopes it’s not all true.

Fascinating, scandalous, mostly authentic…

“Spellbound by Sibella” is the debut historical novel written by Paul B McNulty based on real events in late 18th century Ireland.

Mayor Noreen Heston launches “Spellbound by Sibella.”

Mayor Noreen Heston kindly agreed to launch my historical novel in Castlebar, Co Mayo where I grew up as a boy having been a past-pupil of both St Patrick’s National School and St Gerald’s College. Presiding over the launch were David and Kathryn Brennan of the Castle Book Shop on Wednesday, 20 November 2013.

Paul B McNulty, author of the historical novel “Spellbound by Sibella” is flanked by his wife, Treasa, on the left and by Mayor Noreen Heston, in the middle, who launched his book in the Castle Book Shop, Castlebar, Co Mayo on Wednesday, 20 November 2013.

 

“Spellbound by Sibella” sold-out at book launches

The launches of my historical novel Spellbound by Sibella in Dublin, Galway and Castlebar were beyond expectation.  Even better were follow-up sales which moved my North America publisher to suggest that we might even “have a best seller in the works.”

We were delighted to have distinguished guests at the various launches: Sir Richard Hely Lynch-Blosse 17th Baronet of Oxfordshire did the honours in Dublin in the UCD Campus Bookstore where Philip Harvey presided on Thursday, 7 November 2013.  Sir Richard is a descendant of the male protagonist in the novel, Sir Harry Lynch-Blosse 7th Baronet of Balla, Co Mayo.

Ronnie O’Gorman, the well-known publisher and local historian, did the honours in Galway assisted by the Mayor of Co Galway, Liam Carroll of Oranmore in Charlie Byrne’s Bookshop on Friday 15 November 2013.

Mayor Noreen Heston did the honours in Castlebar, Co Mayo where I grew up as a boy having been a past-pupil of both St Patrick’s National School and St Gerald’s College. Presiding over the launch were David and Kathryn Brennan of the Castle Book Shop on Wednesday, 20 November 2013.

I am now putting the final touches to a follow-up historical novel, The Abduction of Anne O’Donel, which I hope to publish in 2014. Some of the characters in Spellbound by Sibella have minor roles including Sibella Cottle, Sir Harry and Ned Holian.

Launch of "Spellbound by Sibella" by author, Paul B McNulty.

Paul B McNulty, author of the historical novel “Spellbound by Sibella” is flanked on the left by Ronnie O’Gorman, publisher and local historian, who launched the book and by the Mayor of Co Galway, Liam Carroll who presided over the proceedings in Charlie Byrne’s Bookshop in Galway on Thursday, 15 November 2013.

Book launches for “Spellbound by Sibella” by Paul B McNulty

My historical novel, Spellbound by Sibella, recently published by Club Lighthouse CLP, Canada will be launched in November as follows:

Dublin  The Campus Bookshop, UCD, Belfield, Dublin 4, 6pm, Thursday, 7th November. Sir Richard Hely Lynch-Blosse, 17th Baronet to launch.

Galway  Charlie Byrne’s Bookshop, The Cornstore, Middle St, Galway, 6pm, Friday, 15th November. Historian, Ronnie O’Gorman to launch.

Castlebar  Mayo Books, Castle Street, Castlebar, Co Mayo, 7pm, Wednesday, 20 November. Mayor Noreen Heston to launch.

Any interested person is more than welcome to attend any one of these launches.

Five star review

“This is a real gem of a book. It’s the story of a gutsy heroine, Sibella Cottle, and what she has to do to keep lack lustre Sir Harry Lynch-Blosse and father of her children from deserting her and marrying rich heiress Lady Harriet.
It’s a really unusual story involving religion, politics (Sir Harry is a member of Parliament), intrigue and deception. The heart of the story is how Sibella resorts to witchcraft in the end.
A thoroughly enjoyable read. Recommended.”

Cover image for "Spellbound by Sibella"
A portrait of Miss Constable by George Romney circa 1787 courtesy of the Gulbenkian Museum, Lisbon.

 

The Flaying of Human Skin

The flaying of human skin, featured in a Whitechapel episode on ITV (18 September 2013), reminded me of the Judgment of Cambyses, an amazing 1498 portrait by Gerard David. It depicted the punishment of a corrupt Persian judge by flaying him alive. Now hanging in the Groeningemuseum in Bruges, the portrait was intended to remind the aldermen of the city to remain uncorrupted.

A different perspective arises in my historical novel, Spellbound by Sibella, where the skin of a human corpse has been flayed to make a powerful love charm. Known as the spancel of death, Alf MacLochlainn has described it as “an unbroken hoop of skin cut with incantations from a corpse across the entire body from shoulder to footsole and wrapped in silk of the colours of the rainbow and used as a spancel to tie the legs of a person to produce certain effects of witchcraft.”

Wrought by Witchcraft

The reputed spellbinding of Sir Harry Lynch-Blosse of Balla, County Mayo, Ireland by his mistress, Sibella Cottle  has been described by Matthew Archdeacon and more recently by Paul B McNulty in his debut novel, Spellbound by Sibella.  Sibella used the spancel, a powerful love-charm to spellbind Harry circa 1780. Judy Holian, a reputed witch prepared the spancel using skin from the exhumed corpse of a young girl according to T H Nally.

Caesar Otway confirmed the use of the spancel to spellbind men through research in Belmullet, County Mayo. He found that three local girls made matches above their station when using a spancel cut from the corpse of a Trappist monk. Protestant girls ‘of a better sort’ also used a practice that may have originated in 16th century England.

Lady Wilde tells the story of ‘The Fatal Love-Charm’ in which a servant girl of modest looks spellbound her widowed master using a spancel. Exactly one year and a day after her marriage, the spancel was accidentally burnt in her wardrobe. The spell was broken. The master now hated her. Despised and isolated, she died half-mad before the year was out, a conclusion drawn by T H Nally for the fate of Sibella Cottle in his 1916 drama The Spancel of Death.

“Spellbound by Sibella” featuring Miss Constable by George Romney circa 1787, courtesy of the Gulbenkian Museum, Lisbon.

 

“Spellbound by Sibella” (now published)

A penniless beauty, a rakish Baronet.  A scandalous affair that shocks a country.

Spellbound by Sibella by Paul B McNulty is now available as an e-book from Club Lighthouse Publishing, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. Based on real events in late 18th century Ireland, the novel portrays the turbulent liaison between Sir Harry Lynch-Blosse of Balla, Co Mayo and Sibella Cottle, a woman with spellbinding powers reputedly wrought by witchcraft.

This historical novel is downloadable to your computer, Kindle or mobile/cell phone for $5.99, using credit card or PayPal. For further information, click on Club Lighthouse Publishing and follow the attached image on its home page.

“Spellbound by Sibella” by Paul B McNulty is now available from Club Lighthouse Publishing, Canada.

 

Sibella Cottle and Miss Constable

Would you agree that Miss Constable by George Romney is a good representation of Sibella Cottle in my debut novel, Spellbound by Sibella asks paul.mcnulty@ucd.ie?

Miss Constable (1787) by George Romney, 1734-1802. (Original portrait in Gulbenkian Museum, Lisbon)

Miss Constable (1787) by George Romney, 1734-1802.
(Original portrait in Gulbenkian Museum, Lisbon)

 

 

 

Spellbound by Sibella by Paul B McNulty

Club Lighthouse will publish my debut novel, Spellbound by Sibella, as an e-book. But how does one organise a book launch for its release without hard copy? If you have any ideas please respond on my website or e-mail me at paul.mcnulty@ucd.ie. For the record, the novel deals with the turbulent liaison between Sir Harry Lynch-Blosse of Balla, Co Mayo and Sibella Cottle, a woman with spellbinding powers reputedly wrought by witchcraft. Scheduled for release this autumn, the novel is based on real events in late 18th century Ireland. For me, it is a dream come through.